ASETNIOP, the next step of Dvorak keyboards?

The first Dvorak keyboard (and all the variants that appeared afterwise) were designed to avoid wrist injuries by reducing the distance your fingers have to move when typing. Still, movements were still required.

ASETNIOP might be the same philosophy, just one step further: when using it for typing, you do not need to move your fingers anymore.
Continue reading ASETNIOP, the next step of Dvorak keyboards?

Minuum is a tiny predictive keyboard for Android

Are you tired of losing half of your smartphone’s screen to the keyboard? Well, here comes Minuum.

Minuum shrinks the keyboard down to no more than a near-single line, and use a predictive algorithm to ease the text input. If the tiny version is just too tiny, the latest update lets you come back to a full-sized version.

Minuum on Google Play ($4 or €2.90)
Via Lifehacker

The Optimus keyboard might hit the market

I guess you remember about the Optimus keyboard, right? Each key is a screen, thus allowing to change the keys according to the application you use. Well, the people behind it were at CES 2013.

Optimus stand @ CES 2013

And what is the announcement, then? That they succeeded in making it cheaper, with the Optimus Popularis. The solution? Instead of making each key a screen, make each key transparent, and put a unique screen under the whole keyboard.

Now, how much cheaper does that make it? The announced price tag would be $700… It might hit the market this summer, we’ll see then if the success is here

For full advice, see news on the net. They are quite numerous about CES, and you might find some from people who actually tried the keyboard…

(Source: Clubic [FR])

A computer stuffed into a keyboard…

Computers aren’t easy to move around. Keyboards are. What about having a keyboard which actually is a computer? It exists…

The RaspCherry Pi
The RaspCherry Pi

As you would have guessed now that you have seen the name, this project was made using a Raspberry Pi and stuffing it into a keyboard.

Now you can go anywhere with it. All you need is a monitor, and you’re good to go!

For more information, you should go to the original post on preamp.org [German]!

The RaspCherry Pi: inside the keyboard...
The RaspCherry Pi’s guts

Capacitive inputs revisited…

You already know that I am a huge fan of keyboards, with some ideas of my own… I already spoke of capacitive keyboards also.

Well, Synaptics announced new inputs.

The ForcePad

Basically an enhanced trackpad. The main novelty is a variable pressure detection, but it also features a multi-finger detection feature. The pressure is measured for each finger, not as a resultant.

The physical buttons could be removed and replaced with a hard press, thus resulting in thinner pads. So, slimmer laptops, or bigger batteries, … Drawback: we lose the physical sensation of clicking.

As far as I’m concerned, not a problem: I do not use the physical button of a trackpad anymore. With some settings, I have the tap for left-click, tap in pre-defined corner for right-click, move along the edges for scrolling, … Trackpads are great! I only miss not having multi-touch…

Anyway, Synaptics’s video:

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/47329850]

The ThinTouch

I first thought this was a curiosity: ThinTouch is a capacitive keyboard with physical keys. What could be the use?

I already said that I do not believe in flat-surfaced keyboards. Though it might be great to turn a screen into a keyboard with any layout you might need, using it seems impractical to me when you have to use it a lot. I like to feel the keys.

Plus you cannot lay your fingers on the keyboard without activating the keys.

ThinTouch proposes a remedy to these problems. But why, then, use capacitive keys?

First, the keyboard is thinner thus. Combined with the ForcePad, this could be great news for future ultrabooks.

Add to it the pressure-sensitiveness. You could use it to have a upper- or lower-cased character based on the force you apply on the key. Or any other application you might imagine for it.

The video:

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/47458591]

I am growing impatient to see those integrated into new laptops. And to have the occasion to lay my hand on one of these.

[Source: Clubic]

Enhancing virtual keyboards

Since I already began posting on keyboards, I will today focus on touch screens and virtual keyboards.

Some weeks ago, I learned about the release of a new beta version of Swype and had a quick look into it. And other products.

Since yes, there are actually several similar products. In my humble opinion, this is evidence that current solutions for virtual keyboards on touchscreens may not be mature yet. They still need some adjustments. Or brand new features.

In this post, I’ll present a (very) quick tour of what I’ve found.

Continue reading Enhancing virtual keyboards

Keyboards everywhere!

It’s no secret: I do enjoy the keyboard pictures which are used as headers for this blog. On one of them, you can see Vince playing the organ, so of course I notified him I was using his picture against his will…

He took a look at the available headers, and merely told me that lots of keyboards are missing… Continue reading Keyboards everywhere!

Play Me, I’m Yours! [Street Pianos]

I was on the phone with a friend lately. She was in Paris and suddenly said: “You might hear a piano, there’s one in the middle of the train station.”

And then I remembered something I heard the day before: indeed, there are pianos in the streets of Paris so that anybody can play them. This concept is actually an artwork by British artist Luke Jerram.

So here you go, walking through Paris’ streets, and you find a piano, curiously decorated by an artist. Intriguing. And suddenly, someone does not resist any longer, just sits and plays. And people gather, listen. And conversations are born between people who might not even have noticed each other otherwise.

I thought it would be great to share it with you, since the concept seems wonderful to me.

The idea for ‘Play Me, I’m Yours’ came from visiting my local launderette. I saw the same people there each weekend and yet no one talked to one another. I suddenly realised that within a city, there must be hundreds of these invisible communities, regularly spending time with one another in silence. Placing a piano into the space was my solution to this problem, acting as a catalyst for conversation and changing the dynamics of a space.

Luke Jerram, creator of ‘Play Me, I’m Yours’

Now, instead of copy-pasting another website or writing a digest from it, I guess it is more useful to send you see the information directly at their source: